The fun of the Oklahoma Museum Network isn’t just limited to youngsters this summer, as the scientific stars will give adults a look into making their own bath complements as part of the Adult Summer Reading Program in the program “De-Stress with the Science of Herbs and Oils,” coming to the Moore Public Library at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 20.

“There is such a big push to go natural, and there are ways to make your own in a do-it-yourself project,” said Eileen Castle, Outreach Coordinator for the OMN.

Among the projects available will be cocoa butter, salt and sugar scrubs and bath balms, all from natural materials safer than some of what goes into store-bought products.

The bath balms in particular are an item Castle said have grown in popularity, with participants able to customize what they want with herbs and essential oils to get just the right scent.

All supplies will be provided by representatives from the museum network, and participants will get a chance to take several items they have made straight from the program to the bath.

Sponsors of this year’s Summer Reading Program are the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Friends of the Library groups throughout the Pioneer Library System, Hitachi Computer Products of America Inc., the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma College Savings Plan, the Pioneer Library System, Pioneer Library System Foundation, Sonic, The Oklahoma Department of Libraries and The Oklahoman Newspapers in Education.

For more information, visit the library, call 793-5100 or go online to www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org/moore.

• Learn the Wonders of Home Canning in Moore library program

The Moore Public Library provides an education into “The Wonders of Home Canning” at 10 a.m. Monday, June 22, in Room B of the library, 225 S. Howard Ave.

Brenda Hill of the Cleveland County OSU Extension Service brings a wealth of knowledge on the subject and will lead the class, showing off techniques to get started on canning as a way for preserving foods.

Space is limited, so registration in advance is required. The class is for ages 18 and up.

For more information, visit the library, call 793-4349 or go online to www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org/moore.

• Go inside comics with “The Making of Heroes”

Teens have a chance to learn the ins and outs of comic book creation and then potentially get started to making their own creative ideas come to life as part of “The Making of Heroes” at 2 p.m. Monday, June 22, at the Moore Public Library, 225 S. Howard Ave.

Jeff Provine, University of Oklahoma adjunct professor and expert on the subject, will take teens through the big picture and history of comics before narrowing things down to a more focused scope on characters, storylines and more.

While Provine works with college students in his writing classes through the university, he brings many of the same basic concepts to younger groups, as he will to the teen audience in the library.

“We’ve got a history aspect where we will talk about different movements in comics,” Provine said. “We will look at things like political cartoons and comic strips and then build it all up to comic books. We will kind of run through things, talk about characters and plots, protagonists, setting, how it’s all laid out and then get down to the barebones mechanics.”

Provine’s interest in comics began from a young age, as he cut his teeth on such favorites of his day as Farside and Calvin and Hobbes. He’s watched the business become almost exclusively computer-oriented and much more global, but still realizes the value of a good story as the key to a good comic.

“There’s been a complete revolution in the whole industry,” he said. “You see events like Comicon, now you have folks coming in from everywhere, all over the world. They’re sharing all sorts of cool ideas.”

Provine won’t be bringing experts from that far, but he will add to the program with participation from members of the Oklahoma Comic Creators. That group is made up of about 40 Oklahoma artists who collaborate and can share their practical expertise, particularly in the drawing side of comic book creation.

“With the artists I know, they will just start fiddling around on a piece of paper and come up with something,” he said. “And that’s really something anybody can do as a starting point.”

In addition to his expertise in the comic book world, Provine is also noted for his books and knowledge about ghost hunting in Oklahoma. He authored the books “Haunted Norman, Oklahoma” in 2014 and “Campus Ghosts of Norman, Oklahoma,” which focuses on OU, in 2013.

Sponsors of this year’s Summer Reading Program are the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Friends of the Library groups throughout the Pioneer Library System, Hitachi Computer Products of America Inc., the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma College Savings Plan, the Pioneer Library System, Pioneer Library System Foundation, Sonic, The Oklahoma Department of Libraries and The Oklahoman Newspapers in Education.

• Screen printing is super at the library

Local teens can add a personal touch to their wardrobes while learning a new lifelong skill with an afternoon of Super ‘T’ Screen Printing workshop, coming to the Southwest Oklahoma City Public Library at 2 p.m. Monday, June 22.

Instructor Curtis Jones brings a wealth of experience in screen printing and teaching about it. He has been a faculty member in the University of Oklahoma School of Art and Art History for 10 years. Prior to that he taught at the San Francisco Art Institute, Richmond Art Center and California College of Arts and Crafts, where he earlier received his master’s degree.

In the workshop, participants will learn from the ground up about the process. That begins with some introduction to screen printing in general and a basic look at how to use the equipment, before the creative process of working on designs begins.

“The first hour will be on how to prepare a screen, then the rest of the time we’ll just have fun working on some designs,” Jones said.

Screen printing hasn’t changed all that much in Jones’ time learning and then teaching it.

“The process doesn’t change too quickly,” Jones said. “Where it’s really come along is in accessibility and also in portability with the use of computer graphics. Water-based inks have gotten a lot better in quality. If you were doing this in the 80s, there weren’t too many water-based inks, but the quality has gotten to where they’re almost the same to use now.”

Use of the water-based inks helps in cost and in being safer for garments on which they are used.

This program is a starting point for new screen printing equipment that will stay with the Pioneer Library System as components in one of its STEAM Powered Maker Kits. Moving forward, the equipment will be available for use in libraries throughout the system in future programs.

While his work is mostly with college students in his university courses, Jones has taught workshops for a variety of age groups over the years.

He enjoys seeing the spark that can come from teens when they see what a creative outlet screen printing can bring.

“They tend to leave kind of empowered that they could get enough knowledge to get them started and then go from there,” Jones said. “It helps to get a seed planted.”

Sponsors of this year’s Summer Reading Program are the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Friends of the Library groups throughout the Pioneer Library System, Hitachi Computer Products of America Inc., the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma College Savings Plan, the Pioneer Library System, Pioneer Library System Foundation, Sonic, The Oklahoma Department of Libraries and The Oklahoman Newspapers in Education.

For more information, call 979-2200 or go online to www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org/sokc.

• Storytelling duo bringing heroic tales to the library

Peggy Helmick-Richardson was shy. Still is, to hear her tell it. She loved to read but was the quiet girl with her face always buried in a book. It seems like an unlikely personality for a person with such enthusiasm and talent for storytelling.

But alongside her husband Gene, the couple has delighted audiences for years in their home state of Texas with their storytelling exploits. This summer, they’ll come north across the Red River to the Pioneer Library System for a tour of Hometown Libraries, which includes stops at the Moore Public Library at 2 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 23, and the following weekend at the Southwest Oklahoma City Public Library at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 27.

“He dragged me kicking and screaming into storytelling, with the admonition that people needed to hear the stories more than I needed to be shy,” Peggy said.

“I had been married to him probably 10 years and been listening to it and supporting his storytelling and others, and seen what a difference it made in people’s lives. So when he needed someone to help him on the stage, I couldn’t turn him down.”

In a year where Summer Reading is focusing on superheroes, the Richardsons will be focusing on old-time heroes, such as those found in folk tales or traditional stories from days gone past. And while there will be some common themes in the stories they take through the library system, no two stories may go exactly the same. So audiences won’t be disappointed if they see the performers more than once on their tour.

“Because we tell in tandem, we a lot of times will do twists on stories to make it more of a ‘he said, she said’ type thing. Our stories are very changeable, a lot of times we may tell a story one way and then find it might be different. A lot of times, it depends on who’s sitting in front of us.”

The Richardsons have been with Mid-America Arts Alliance since 2006, are part of the Texas Community of Arts roster and are active with the Texas Storytelling Association.

They’ve told tales far and wide, in schools, libraries, at festivals and even in correctional facilities.

“One of our sayings is that our tellings run from preschools to prisons,” Peggy said. “We just told at federal penitentiary recently. Honestly prisons are some of our best audiences, prisoners appreciate that someone has remembered them.”

The couple also likes to see their storytelling inspire a younger generation to learn the art of telling their own stories.

“We like to use our storytelling to encourage deeper thought and creativity and individuality,” Peggy said. “Storytelling can be such an empowering tool. It’s a guide if used properly. Storytelling is powerful, because not only does it teach us how to lead our lives, but also it entertains us.”

Sponsors of this year’s Summer Reading Program are the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Friends of the Library groups throughout the Pioneer Library System, Hitachi Computer Products of America Inc., the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma College Savings Plan, the Pioneer Library System, Pioneer Library System Foundation, Sonic, The Oklahoma Department of Libraries and The Oklahoman Newspapers in Education.

• ‘Paint Your World’ with adult art program

Paint found canvas and laughs filled the air across the Pioneer Library System last summer, as the experts from Be Wild For Art took their painting classes on the road.

It was such a popular tour, that the ladies will be back again this summer, visiting the Southwest Oklahoma City Public Library at 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 23, for the program, “Paint Your World.”

For co-founders Desiree and Cyndy Cashman and their staff, it’s an opportunity to share the joy of painting and art, much as they do in their Norman studio. And their tour of libraries last summer wasn’t just popular for the participants.

“The people we met were so much fun, we met a lot of fun personalities,” Cyndy said. “And every location was different, the personalities, the vibe of the library. The people were very friendly and I know we really enjoyed it.”

The format of this year’s event will be similar to last summer. Each library will pick a portrait as a starting point. Each participant receives a pallet and materials and then will create their own masterpiece. No two paintings in an audience will be the same, or be right or wrong.

“There’s actually a fair amount they can learn,” Cyndy said. “A lot of that depends on how well we can get them to relax, and to really look at what they’re looking at as an inspiration for what they’re doing.”

During the program, one artist will paint along with the students, while at least one other assistant will walk the room and provide hands-on help and advice where needed.

“We like to have one person up there at the front interacting, and then one walking around encouraging and demonstrating technique one-on-one.”

As a studio, Be Wild for Art has continued to grow and enjoy success since its founding in 2010, adding more workshops for children and teens to their popular sessions for adults.

“People kind of like doing the one-sit deals, and there is a lot they can learn even in one day,” Cyndy said.

Sponsors of this year’s Summer Reading Program are the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Friends of the Library groups throughout the Pioneer Library System, Hitachi Computer Products of America Inc., the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma College Savings Plan, the Pioneer Library System, Pioneer Library System Foundation, Sonic, The Oklahoma Department of Libraries and The Oklahoman Newspapers in Education.

For more information, visit the library, call 979-2200 or go online to www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org/sokc.

• Unmask some heroes with Extreme Animals' SOKC library presentation

The Southwest Oklahoma City Public Library welcomes some four-legged and furry friends for “Animal Heroes: Unmasked,” a Summer Reading Program event at 2 p.m. Friday, June 26.

The presentation by Extreme Animals of Oklahoma City will showcase exotic wildlife from different parts of the world, and show off some of their “superhero” abilities.

Extreme Animals exhibits and educates on exotic animals, as well as participating in animal rescue projects. The organization visits schools, libraries and other venues throughout the region.

The program is geared to children, but all ages are invited to attend.

Registration is required in advance for each attendee, including parents.

For more information, visit the library, call 979-2200 or go online to www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org/sokc

 

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